Damaging Healthy Eye Cells: New Insights Into Diseases Causing The Loss Of Vision.

Source : Medical News Today

There are two major light receptor cells in the mammalian eye: rods and cones. New research by scientists from Duke University have shown that dying cone cells can trigger the demise of healthy rod cells, leading to the loss of vision.Full Story
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