A Valuable New Applications Resource From BMG LABTECH

Source : BMG LABTECH

A perfectly engineered microplate reader is only part of the solution. Knowing how to effectively perform all of the leading applications on that instrument is the final piece of the puzzle. This is why BMG LABTECH has created an application notes binder, which combines all of the current application notes into one resource. The application notes detailed in our Application Notes Binder were all performed on BMG LABTECH's wide range of microplate readers and they outline a variety of experiments, including:

• Protein-protein interactions

• DNA and protein quantification

• ADME and toxicology studies

• Molecular binding assays

• Drug solubility

• Genotyping

• ELISA and EIA

• Cell based assays

• Reporter gene assays

• Receptor-ligand binding

• Second messenger signaling

• Enzyme activity and kinetic assays

To request your copy, visit: http://www.bmglabtech.com/application-notes/request-applications-binder.cfm

With nearly 3,000 application notes, peer-reviewed articles and scientific posters, BMG LABTECH’s online searchable applications database offers a plethora of information on how to perform countless applications on our microplate readers.

Visit BMG LABTECH’s Online Applications Center to download all of the leading applications: http://www.bmglabtech.com/applications.

BMG LABTECH, bringing the future of microplate reader technology to you today.

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