Cellquant And Redquant Kits Now Available Exclusively Through Diagnostica Stago

Source : Diagnostica Stago, Inc.

September 22, 2010, Parsippany, NJ — Diagnostica Stago, Inc. (DSI) announces exclusive distribution of the Biocytex Cellquant PNH and Redquant PNH assay kits, previously available through Beckman Coulter. Cellquant and Redquant are no-wash, whole blood, single-color, quantitative, research-use-only flow cytometry assays for analysis of granulocytes and red blood cells, respectively, from patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH). The kits are an excellent method to identify candidates for eculizumab (Soliris) therapy, the only FDA-approved PNH treatment.

PNH is a complex, rare and acquired clonal disorder that causes hemolysis due to a cellular deficiency of CD55 and CD59 proteins. Cellquant and Redquant are the only commercially available assays for research-use-only PNH diagnosis, and their standardized and reproducible flow cytometry technique, including use of pre-calibrated beads, replaces older Ham and sucrose hemolysis tests. Both are CE approved and IVD compliant, with smaller blood volumes (410 μL) and less time compared to ‘home brew’ methods.

The Cellquant and Redquant kits are for research use only in the United States and Canada, and are not for use in diagnostic procedures.

Diagnostica Stago, Inc. is the exclusive provider of the Diagnostica Stago Hemostasis product lines in the United States and offers a complete system of coagulation instruments and optimized reagent kits for research as well as for routine analysis. Diagnostica Stago, Inc. is the U.S. subsidiary of Diagnostica Stago, S.A.S. France, a leader in the development and manufacture of Hemostasis products. For more information about any Stago product or service, please call 800-222-COAG or visit our website at www.stago-us.com. .

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