Ocean Optics Launches Powerful New Spectroscopy Software

Source : Ocean Optics

OceanView’s customizable interface puts the user in control

Dunedin, FL (May 14, 2013) – Ocean Optics has released OceanView spectroscopy software, combining powerful data processing capabilities with a clear graphical user interface for use with the company’s miniature spectrometers. OceanView is highly customizable and includes a schematic view that provides a visual roadmap of data flow from spectral inputs to processed results.

OceanView displays and utilizes spectral data from Ocean Optics spectrometers with the added flexibility of integrating temperature, voltage and other input data, allowing users to capture and visualize data from multiple sources. In addition, OceanView saves and reloads previous experiments and has a persistence of settings feature that conveniently recalls acquisition parameters and file locations. Users can customize the OceanView interface once and later access those same settings without having to rebuild them with each new session.

Inspired by customer feedback across a variety of applications, OceanView delivers a high level of experimental control. Its schematic view – a flow chart with each step of the process represented – functions as both a blueprint of the data process from inputs to results and a tool to inspect and modify the process on the fly. It delivers results in the form of an answer, rather than just a simple waveform. More than 70 schematic nodes, or connection points, can be mapped in the schematic view. Other experiment control functions such as spectral splicing, interpolation and device output control are available.

To learn more about OceanView, visit www.OceanOptics.com, contact an Ocean Optics Applications Scientist at +1 727-733-2447 or info@oceanoptics.com. ###

  • <<
  • >>

Articles List

  • Chromosomes Customized While-U-Wait with Genome-Editing Services

    Chromosomes Customized While-U-Wait with Genome-Editing Services

    With each new technical advance, genome editing becomes ever more accessible. Yet it’s still not a trivial matter to create a homogenous cell line with a targeted disruption, and even less so with a gain-of-function mutation, and any researchers have turned to commercial companies and university core facilities, practiced in the art and armed with the most up-to-date knowledge, to help. Here’s what you can expect.
  • Average, Shmaverage! Embrace Heterogenity with Single-Cell Transcriptomics

    Average, Shmaverage! Embrace Heterogenity with Single-Cell Transcriptomics

    Researchers have over the past few years developed tools to downsize their research to the single-cell level. Some are based on next-generation DNA sequencing, others rely on microscopy or flow cytometry. But all of them are exposing the heterogeneity of seemingly uniform cell populations as never before.

Disqus Comments