A New Treatment For Kidney Disease-Associated Heart Failure?

Source : Journal of Clinical Investigation

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients frequently suffer from mineral bone disorder, which causes vascular calcification and, eventually, chronic heart failure. Similar to patients with CKD, mice with low levels of the protein klotho (klotho hypomorphic mice) also develop vascular calcification and have shorter life spans compared to normal mice. In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Florian Lang and colleagues at the University of Tübingen in Germany, found that treatment with the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone reduced vascular calcification in klotho hypomorphic mice and increased their life span. In a companion Attending Physician article, Darryl Quarles of the University of Tennessee discusses the implications of these findings for the treatment of CKD patients.

TITLE:
Spironolactone-sensitive vascular calcification and Pit-1-dependent osteoblastic differentiation in klotho-hypomorphic mice

AUTHOR CONTACT:
Florian Lang
Dept. of Physiology, Tuebingen, NULL, DEU
Phone: +4970712972194; Fax: +497071295618; E-mail: florian.lang@uni-tuebingen.de

View this article at: http://www.jci.org/articles/view/64093?key=3010c850d2f970ad6617

ACCOMPANYING THE ATTENDING PHYSICIAN

TITLE:
Reducing cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease: something borrowed, something new

AUTHOR CONTACT:
Darryl Quarles
University of Tennessee Health Science Center, memphis, TN, USA
Phone: 901-448-1459; Fax: 901-448-1188; E-mail: dquarles@uthsc.edu

View this article at: http://www.jci.org/articles/view/67203?key=054ae63743c930253936

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