Complementary And Alternative Medicine Studied In Swedish Surgical Care

Source : University of Gothenburg

Osteopathy may help reduce chronic pain and stiffness after thoracic surgery. However, electrotherapy is not effective pain treatment in the aftermath of pancreatic surgery. These are the findings of a thesis from Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, that studied complementary and alternative therapies.

Massage, acupuncture, healing, homeopathy: use of so-called complementary and alternative medicine is widespread in Sweden and the rest of the western world.

Although still skeptical, surgical healthcare professionals also want to learn more about these methods. These are the findings of a thesis from Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.

In two studies, clinical nurse specialist Kristofer Bjerså examined the understanding of healthcare professionals regarding complementary and alternative therapies in the context of surgical care at Sweden's seven university hospitals. The findings show that personnel consider it important to know about these methods, and that skepticism still exists alongside a desire to learn more.

Kristofer Bjerså and his colleagues also studied two therapies for postoperative care. One study tested transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) as a complementary pain control method after pancreatic surgery.

"This concerns major abdominal surgery that requires sophisticated pain control in the aftermath, but according to our study, TENS was not effective. In fact, the method posed an obstacle for patients and healthcare personnel, because patients had trouble getting in and out of bed freely due to the extra wires attached to their bodies."

Another study tested osteopathic treatment to relieve pain, stiffness and respiratory limitations in patients who had undergone surgery of the oesophagus through thoracotomy (incision between the ribs). In the study, eight patients received 45 minutes of osteopathic treatment per week for 10 weeks.

"People who have had thoracotomies typically experience long-term chronic pain in the chest. Our study suggests that osteopathic therapy after a thoracotomy may be effective, but more and larger studies are necessary before any recommendations can be made," says Kristofer Bjerså.

###

Contact:

Kristofer Bjerså, doctoral student at the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg,
+46 (0)31-342 87 35
+46 (0)72-743 61 56
kristofer.bjersa@vgregion.se

Primary supervisor: associate professor Monika Fagevik Olsén, physiotherapist, Physical Therapy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
Phone: +46 (0)31-342 11 95
E-mail: monika.fagevik-olsen@vgregion.se

  • <<
  • >>

Articles List

  • Seeking a Happy (Cell Culture) Medium

    Seeking a Happy (Cell Culture) Medium

    Cell lines have been a staple of medical research at least since Henrietta Lacks’ ovarian tumor became HeLa cells more than half a century ago. Today, culturing continuous, immortalized cells is relatively routine—just take a bottle of medium off the shelf, throw in some serum (if it’s not already in there), add it to a flask and keep it cozy in a CO2 incubator. Primary cells and stem cells, on the other hand, are fussier. They have a limited life span, need a special blend of factors to grow and are susceptible to other factors that can take them down an undesired differentiation pathway. Here we look at some of the media researchers use to keep such finicky cells happy.
  • More than One Way to Change a Base

    More than One Way to Change a Base

    It’s easier than ever these days to clone and sequence DNA. Thanks to CRISPR/Cas and related technologies, it’s even straightforward to rewrite genomic sequences in living cells and organisms. But as powerful as it is, CRISPR, et al., cannot induce genetic rewrites in a test tube—genome editing requires cellular machinery to repair the DNA breaks the methods produce. Instead, researchers interested in mutating cloned genes on plasmids must revert to a tried-and-true method, site-directed mutagenesis. First described in the 1970s—and earning its inventor a share of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1993—site-directed mutagenesis uses short oligonucleotides to introduce single base changes, as well as insertions and deletions, to DNA plasmids. Researchers can use the method to swap amino acids in expressed proteins, test clinically relevant mutations and tweak promoters. But there’s more than one way to change a base, and molecular-tools vendors have commercialized multiple strategies. Here, we review some of the more popular approaches to site-directed mutagenesis.

Disqus Comments